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  1. #1

    raised pond advise

    hi, im new to the forum, but after asking on facebook groups and getting very littel helpful advise im hoping my luck here will be better.
    pond final layout #2.png

    we've decide to upgrade and build a much larger raised pond for our koi and sturgeon ( quickly realised our current 1500liter pond is too small).so after some thought settled on a design and a depth of 4ft, 2ft below ground and 2ft raised above ground level. for the raised portion of the sides im using sleepers on a concrete footing and a rubber linner. filteration wise this is what i was consideing https://www.pondkeeper.co.uk/pondxpert- ... r.../p1940

    the only feedback i got off facbook has been comment after comment saing use an eazypod and bottom drain, so off i went to look at eazypods. they look ok but only rated upto 10,00 liter, and mine is going to be roughly 14,000. that lead me to finding the nexus 220 that seems to be the better option.

    so so in short:
    #1 will the filter linked above be ok...if the answer is no then would the eazy pod be ok or do i need to go with the nexus 220?
    #2 if i go with a gravity fed filter, is an aerated bottom drain needed?
    #3 what are my options skimmer wise that i can fit into the sleeper wall?

    any help or advise will be much welcome



  2. #2
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckgav View Post
    the only feedback i got off facbook has been comment after comment saing use an eazypod and bottom drain, so off i went to look at eazypods. they look ok but only rated upto 10,00 liter, and mine is going to be roughly 14,000. that lead me to finding the nexus 220 that seems to be the better option.

    so so in short:
    #1 will the filter linked above be ok...if the answer is no then would the eazy pod be ok or do i need to go with the nexus 220?
    #2 if i go with a gravity fed filter, is an aerated bottom drain needed?
    #3 what are my options skimmer wise that i can fit into the sleeper wall?

    any help or advise will be much welcome
    1/2 or x0.6 the advertised capacity/rate. A 25,000lph capacity drum is basically what you want.

    My pond is basically 14000 litres. I wouldn't bother with a nexus and just head straight for a drum/bio. The option you may want to look at is an airlift and the use of vegetation (ie water plants) or anoxic filter.

    This is mine before xmas - work in progress and just being filled for the first time.

    IMG_9148.jpg

    The drum could have been a drop in at the back but instead the drum is installed in the garage. The rear is a chamber for anoxic filter baskets and two airlifts. The pump is designed to run without a water pump.
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

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  4. #3
    ive been seeing alot about airlift filters, i think i get the basics on how they work ( moving the water). whats needed for the anoxic filter? from what ive seed folks use a type of catliter and plant with specific water plants?

    your pond is looking awsome by the way

  5. #4
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckgav View Post
    ive been seeing alot about airlift filters, i think i get the basics on how they work ( moving the water). whats needed for the anoxic filter? from what ive seed folks use a type of catliter and plant with specific water plants?
    Some intro and science behind anoxic filters: Anoxic Filtration

    A thread: https://www.koiforum.uk/water-treatm...nt-dinner.html

    The plants are optional and to be honest are likely to cause roots to invade between the pots.
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

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  7. #5
    Senior Member Rank = Supreme Champion Ajm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickK-UK View Post
    Some intro and science behind anoxic filters: Anoxic Filtration

    A thread: https://www.koiforum.uk/water-treatm...nt-dinner.html

    The plants are optional and to be honest are likely to cause roots to invade between the pots.
    Rethinking this idea my self now I keep coming back to it about 5 6 times now lol just need to get it done I think . Same with the airlift that has just been OK ed by the Mrs lol

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    "we are water keepers first"

    Johnathan

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  9. #6
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
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    So one thing to point out to the OP:

    With any current mainstream bio you'll end up with the following nitrogen cycle, which you're probably aware of in your existing pond:

    N2 -(fish/wildlife)-> Ammonia (NH3) -(bacteria+oxygen)-> Nitrite (NO2) -(bacteria+oxygen)-> Nitrate (NO3)

    The issue is that normal bios (with media and blown air) typically accelerate the NH3 --> NO3 process and don't remove the nitrogen from the pond. Thus the water exchanges or trickles required to remove the nitrogen before the NO3 levels build. You can see this is basically an oxidation (ie like burning, bacteria use oxygen to release energy from each step).

    Anoxic filters are different.

    N2 -(fish/wildlife-> Ammonia (NH3) -(anoxic bacteria)-> N2 (gas).

    Here the bacteria live in low oxygen levels, the basket attracts the NH3 by electrical attraction (NH3 is an 'ion' and is actually slightly electrically charged). The baskets therefore mop up the NH3, the bacteria, in a low oxygen atmosphere then consume the NH3 and release nitrogen as N2 which is a stable gas (the atmosphere is a majority of nitrogen), where it will rise and exit the filter/pond.

    The nitrogen gas dissolved into water may affect the water in a number of ways - pH being more acidic (nitric acid and being converted to ammonia by other bacteria. Although those are minimal.

    A pond isn't solely a single process, so you will still get some oxygenated cycle thus some NO2 and NO3, but the reduced amount can be used by the pond and a planting of veggie in a basket (I'll use floating/side baskets as the pond is too deep).
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

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  11. #7
    Hello mate,

    I am no expert but I am building a pond with the same method you are planning, so to answer your questions and a couple of my own thoughts on your plan....

    1) The link didn't work for me but, yes you will need the Nexus 220, always best to over filter.
    2) Go with gravity fed as its the best way and worth the extra work - I had a pump fed system for a long time. You need to put air into the pond anyway and an aerated bottom drain helps the waste into the bottom drain, improves water circulation and puts air in, so yes they are worth it.
    3) Most of the skimmers come with an option to add a extension so the back of the skimmer comes past the sleeper wall. You will just have to leave a space in the side wall for it.

    I think there is a helpful sticky post that answers loads of initial questions about builds on the pond construction front page.

    Your filter options are down to cost and space. If you have a drum filter you need to add waste pipes and fresh water to the filter house.
    I have learned that the filter location needs to be large and plan for future upgrades. In your plan the filter area looks a bit small. Also you can add a bead filter to the skimmer line to help the nexus and make the clarity better. so might need even more space for that kind of system.
    one more thing that i thought is your water circulation and the position of the skimmer - will the water flow around the pond and push surface waste into the skimmer or will it get stuck in the corner away from the skimmer near the decking?

    I planned mine for ages and still wish I done it a bit different, good luck

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  13. #8
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
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    I went for an aerating JBR bottom drain and skimmer - all on 4" pipework (actually an adaptor to 110mm pipe).

    The Nexus will also need water and a waste pipe plumbed in.

    One thing people forget is to plan for your water level, do this by planning down from a level line that is above the top of the sleeper wall. Then mark the laser line in a couple of places that can't get removed/knocked over - then measure all your measurements down from that laser line. For example:

    IMG_9034.jpg

    That includes your planned water level - that way you can plan your walls and overflow point into the waste (yes ponds fill up with a rainstorm!) AND more importantly, you can see your water level in the filters.

    After all the work - the pond floor is sculpted towards the drain a little, the slab and blocks are level and so are the coping stones on top. The laser line was lasered into the garage and so to the water level - a good two+ meters away! There's about a centimetre of error across the site so this works really well.
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

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  15. #9
    Sorry if you have the wrong impression, but I'm a complete novice
    I'm just the guy building it, the Mrs is the fish person.
    So your info on nitrogen cycles, has taught me something. My understanding was that bacteria grew in a filter and broke down the nitrogen + amonia, guess I was wrong. So If I understand, the Nexus will do some of the filtering but I'll either have to add in a trickle feed of fresh water, or a anoxic filter too

  16. #10
    I think the decision has pretty much been made that we are using an aerated bottom drain, and a skimmer from jbr plastics (that is made for sleeper ponds) , however I'll have a look at extending skimmers and see if they work out better. As for the circulation, that was a concern of mine too.....I have a couple of pumps and stainless steel water blades from my current pond, so had the thought of using the larger of these on the top lefthand side. But wasn't sure whether putting a pump in to Feed it would hinder the flow of waste to the bottom drain. I'll add a picture to show where I planned to place the bottom drain IMG_20220117_162832.png

    Oh and I forgot to say the the original post that I also intend to fit a UV filter too
    Last edited by buckgav; 18-01-2022 at 10:20 AM.

  17. #11
    Senior Member Rank = Jussai Twhitenosugar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckgav View Post
    Sorry if you have the wrong impression, but I'm a complete novice
    I'm just the guy building it, the Mrs is the fish person.
    So your info on nitrogen cycles, has taught me something. My understanding was that bacteria grew in a filter and broke down the nitrogen + amonia, guess I was wrong. So If I understand, the Nexus will do some of the filtering but I'll either have to add in a trickle feed of fresh water, or a anoxic filter too
    It is a bit bewildering but for filtration it can be boiled down 2 types of filtration.

    1) mechanical, which is the removal of physical particles in the water e.g. poo, algae, leaves etc ..

    Examples of this are filter brushes, sieves, drums, eazypod (or the central bit of a nexus). Basically anything that catches the crap as water flows through your filter.

    Ideally you want a mech. filter that collects most of the stuff going through it and importantly is easy to clean.

    And the other is..

    2) Biological, which deals with the fish wee i.e. ammonia.

    Fish excrete ammonia, which is toxic. Fortunately naturally occuring bacteria can break that down to nitrite.

    But nitrite is also toxic. Again bacteria in a bio filter can break that down to nitrates, which are non toxic to fish in reasonable doses.

    Examples of a bio filter are the outer chamber of the Nexus, a moving bed filter, a shower filter etc.... Basically anything with a large surface are for the bacteria to grow on.

    So as you see a nexus does both types of filtration in a relatively small space. Hence why some people like them.

    The issue is that nitrates (which are like plant food and helps make pond water go green) are hard to remove.

    Plants can remove it, but realistically to remove nitrates, and other stuff that builds up in the water you need to do regular water changes. This is the case with nearly all types of filtration.

    Whether you do this by a constant
    trickle or bigger one off changes is up to you.

    Anoxic filters are a bio filter that skips all of the above and basically turns ammonia into nitrogen gas, which will naturally leave the pond. So no nitrite or nitrate. But it works best when it's the only type of bio filter.

    To keep bio filters clean and working effectively, you must have a mechanical filter before it.

    Hope that helps clarify things.







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    13,000L fibreglassed raised pond with window

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