Welcome to Koi Forum. Is this your first visit? Register
TuffX Glass
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Junior Member Rank = Fry Luminosity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Staffordshire
    Posts
    17
    Thanks / Likes
    14

    Best All-in-One Filter system

    Hello everyone,

    Another newbie question I'm afraid. I'm rather nervous about doing extensive amounts of pipework and electrics as i simply dont have the skill in these areas.

    Does anyone know of a good all in one solution for filtration on a pond around 3000 gallons? By all in one i mean one that has mechanical, biological and UV all in one place so i dont need to be running pipes and ball valves all over the place going between different units

    Edit: I should add im going to be doing a gravity fed system



  2. Thanks davethefish1 Thanked / Liked this Post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Rank = Mature Champion samp09's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    2,190
    Thanks / Likes
    4418
    Quote Originally Posted by Luminosity View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Another newbie question I'm afraid. I'm rather nervous about doing extensive amounts of pipework and electrics as i simply dont have the skill in these areas.

    Does anyone know of a good all in one solution for filtration on a pond around 3000 gallons? By all in one i mean one that has mechanical, biological and UV all in one place so i dont need to be running pipes and ball valves all over the place going between different units

    Edit: I should add im going to be doing a gravity fed system
    Hello Luminosity, the ideal solution for this would be a drum with a bio chamber and UV all in one: https://queni-koi.co.uk/filtration-c...2-295-00-p6336 you would need to add the amalgam UV to this but it just slides in to a tank connector it sounds like. Obviously these are expensive so it would also depend on your budget. You could always see if someone local could help with the pipework or guidance on how to do it? It really isn't difficult, if you can use a hand saw your half way there, its just making sure everything is planned out and cut to size before going in with the solvent weld.

  4. Thanks Ajm, NickK-UK, Luminosity Thanked / Liked this Post
  5. #3
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,215
    Thanks / Likes
    1398
    Quote Originally Posted by Luminosity View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Another newbie question I'm afraid. I'm rather nervous about doing extensive amounts of pipework and electrics as i simply dont have the skill in these areas.

    Does anyone know of a good all in one solution for filtration on a pond around 3000 gallons? By all in one i mean one that has mechanical, biological and UV all in one place so i dont need to be running pipes and ball valves all over the place going between different units

    Edit: I should add im going to be doing a gravity fed system
    Hi,

    There is no 'easy' option at this size but if you don't mind the running costs of a pump (200-300W), air (40-70W), UVC (100W) plus the water cost for trickle (5-10% replacement) with the associated carbon replacements (70/6m) for water filtration, then you could look at a large Nexus+drum+UVC+pump. You would need to plumb it in. Unfortunately over about 8,000l the number of realistic 'all in one' products is very limited. In real use most claimed advertised rates of water flow aren't achievable - multiply the rate by 0.6 (to get 60%) or 1/2 the claimed rate. Given the rate depends on the stocking and size of the fish waste..

    Filtration is mechanical separation and biological treatment. The drum provides good physical filtration, the nexus provides the biological (as the drum replaces the original nexus mechanical filter that needs high maintenance plus the drum removes finer particles). The trickle water replacement is needed to prevent bio by-products becoming toxic. The beauty of the drum is the clear water.

    One thing to consider is running costs and future rises.

    I have a small pond (1500l) and a designed a new larger pond (~14000l, or 3600 uk gallons). The small pond has had two pressure filters and now a drum+bio running on it. The pump is 50W plus the drum water cost - I don't run a UVC and the pond sits in direct sunlight (it's a natural planted pond with veggie filter too) nor do I trickle replace the water (thanks to the veggies).
    The new pond - it's designed to run on 58W for 14,000l. However it needs the airlifts to replace the pump and will use anoxic baskets in a chamber as an anoxic filter - replacing the bio eventially - thus should not require tickle water replacements.

    So with that in mind.

    Pressure filters - forget about it over 2,000l, actually forget it under 2,000..
    Multi-bay filters - an option but you want a sieve or drum in front, it requires plumbing and has high maintenance. You could make a bay an anoxic basket bay - but the baskets may be too large.
    Ezpod - forget it over 5,000l. Also needs maintenance + trickle.
    Nexus - the large one, could do over 10,000l but is essentially multi-bay filter with slightly lower maintainance than the multi-bay. Needs waste pumping (although clean to waste is manual except for the auto box add-on).
    Nexus + internal drum - the 'drop-in' drum replaces the first stage nexus mechanical filter. Better water quality, lower maintenance and no additional drum space as it's in the nexus. Needs UVC and pump separate. Needs water supply and waste plumbing as the drum automatically flushes to waste.
    Sieve + Nexus - lower cost and lower performance version of the drum that needs manual maintenance. Needs trickle, needs waste plumbing and having a water supply near by is good to spray down the sieve.
    Drum + bio - standalone drum and bio does what the nexus does, more efficient but takes more space. Needs trickle, low maintenance. Needs waste plumbing. Some drums have an inbuilt UVC but careful of the plastic and seals.
    Drum + bio combi - all in one where the drum drops into the bio.

    The other options are more involved - although the pumping could be easy with simply a bay with baskets and veggies, a drum on the front and a U bend airlift that the back.
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

  6. Thanks Ajm, Luminosity Thanked / Liked this Post
  7. #4
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Jussai NickK-UK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,215
    Thanks / Likes
    1398
    Quote Originally Posted by samp09 View Post
    Hello Luminosity, the ideal solution for this would be a drum with a bio chamber and UV all in one: https://queni-koi.co.uk/filtration-c...2-295-00-p6336 you would need to add the amalgam UV to this but it just slides in to a tank connector it sounds like. Obviously these are expensive so it would also depend on your budget. You could always see if someone local could help with the pipework or guidance on how to do it? It really isn't difficult, if you can use a hand saw your half way there, its just making sure everything is planned out and cut to size before going in with the solvent weld.
    I agree- that is both a good brand and the size of 25,000l is good enough to not have issues with 3,000g. Check the physical size and space you have it's going to be big

    Only difficulty is it will need water plumbed in, waste plumbed and a water trickle (for the byproducts) - you could run a fibreglass bay on the return (as a waterfall?) and then plant that bay with water plants that absorb nitrates etc or put some anoxic baskets in at a later stage.

    Solvent welding pipes is relatively easy. I use Tangit glue - this has a longer setting time of about 20-30 seconds. Leave for 24 hours and it's completely cured. I also use Griffon PVCU cleaner/primer.
    1. Cut pipe length.
    2. Chamfer edge (stops glue being pushed out as the pipe is being pushed into the fitting).
    3. Clean with a cloth
    4. Dry fit - mark the fitting insert limit with a marker pen on the pipe - this tells you how far you need to push the pipe in. Mark the fitting and the pipe with a line - this tells you the orientation of the pipe/joint if there's bits already joined.
    When ready.. and joints separated
    5. Griffon cleaner/primer on a rag - wipe around (once this is on do not try to dry fit again) on the fitting inside and the pipe.
    6. Tangit glue on the fitting and then the pipe.
    7. Push in and twist so that the orientation line match up, and the pipe inserted to the marker limit line. Keep the joint together for 20-30 seconds after keep it supported, it may be set but it's also fragile until fully cured.
    8. Whilst the glue is liquid, take a rag and just go around the joint external edge of the joint so any excess is smeared around keeps any water out of the joint (stops ice from forming in the joint).
    9. Check inside so there's no glue blocking.
    10. Next piece..

    4"/110mm pipe needs some planning due to the size/length and weight. Unless they're small sections I would advise a two person fit. I bought a 110mm chamfer tool that fits on the drill - I had a load of pipe joints.
    1-2" pipe is easy and can be chamfered with a file and sandpaper. Just remember to clean off any swarf or bits of plastic (step 3 above should do) and ensure the inside bore is clear (otherwise blanketweed etc will entangle on plastic sticking out in the water flow.

    Most people can get away with a 4"/110mm bottom drain to filter connection (possibly an optional skimmer line - make that 4"/110mm too) then a pump with 2"/63mm. Airlifts like low resistance of flow hence the reason I went with 110mm throughout.
    1700 litres on 50 watts
    Eco Pond 2.0: 13,000 litres, 58W airlifts, 1300l anoxic, Solum 16. No pump.

  8. Thanks Dom G20, samp09, Luminosity Thanked / Liked this Post
  9. #5
    Senior Member Rank = Yonsai Dom G20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Nottinghamshire
    Posts
    206
    Thanks / Likes
    329
    From my experience - helping dad with his pond for years with an Eazypod.

    Also having my own 4000g pond with easypod and KK 20000 multi bay these filters although good and relatively easy to set up are very labour intensive!

    Today I am doing another filter clean so 1.5 hours in 3 degrees getting covered in muck and cold water. Not ideal I promise you that.

    When I first joined this forum the members told me Id be looking for a drum after a few years. Wish they told me the winning lottery numbers as well because they were right.

    My advise would be drum - bio - shower - although getting the set up right will be work and planning, once in maintenance is reduced significantly.

    If you want an all in one the QK combi looks great - I got the separate drum and bio as height restrictions in my filter pit.

    My honest recommendation would be get some help from someone who is handy with electrics and pipework - doesnt have to be professional or learn from YouTube and this forum like I did!

    Pipework advise above is absolutely spot on, if you are worried get some small cheap joint and some pipework and do a few practice runs. Confidence booster!

    Best of luck with the plans!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. Thanks Luminosity Thanked / Liked this Post
  11. #6
    Junior Member Rank = Fry Luminosity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Location
    Staffordshire
    Posts
    17
    Thanks / Likes
    14
    Thanks for the advice everyone much appreciated!

  12. #7
    Senior Member Rank = Yonsai KevT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    W Yorkshire
    Posts
    217
    Thanks / Likes
    251
    Hi Luminosity

    How far is the build - if you are going gravity feed have you already installed the bottom drain - if so this is one of the most complex part of the build - if not it looks like you are going to have to pay someone to do the bottom drain as this is all one system should be done at each stage of the build

    1 Bottom drain
    2 Finish pond to point where water is going in
    3 Decide what filter and layout - 's
    4 Plumb filter
    5 Fill pond with water
    6 Add fish

    Sit back and relax - I wish


    KevT

 

 

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:21 AM. Online Koi Mag Forum
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2022 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

vBulletin Improved By vBFoster® (Lite Version), © UltimateScheme, Ltd.