Welcome to Koi Forum. Is this your first visit? Register
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Member Rank = Sansai forever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Oxted
    Posts
    93
    Thanks / Likes
    51

    Pond Paint and Sealant

    So finally found someone to finish off the build of my pond, his recommendation is smooth render the sides and bottom, then he uses a water proof paint, its not fibre glass, but he always does this on large ponds, any thoughts? I will find out the exact product when i get the quote but wondered if others have gone down this route..



  2. Thanks Ajm Thanked / Liked this Post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Rank = Supreme Champion Ajm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Durham
    Posts
    6,562
    Thanks / Likes
    13677
    Thought about paint before but it will flake at some point imo and you can guarantee it will be at the bottom meaning a full pond drain

    Sent from my F5121 using Tapatalk
    Johnathan

  4. Thanks forever, Gazkoi Thanked / Liked this Post
  5. #3
    Senior Member Rank = Nanasai Handy Kenny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Livingston Scotland
    Posts
    586
    Thanks / Likes
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by forever View Post
    So finally found someone to finish off the build of my pond, his recommendation is smooth render the sides and bottom, then he uses a water proof paint, its not fibre glass, but he always does this on large ponds, any thoughts? I will find out the exact product when i get the quote but wondered if others have gone down this route..
    My 20,000 litre pond is organically shaped with 4 inches of concrete with plastic needles. I rendered the inside of my pond with a render mix containing fibre glass fibres and then burnt off any fibres sticking out of the render before going over the whole thing twice with a pressure washer. Then painted with a pond paint from Antel a UK company, who provided a two pack paint at a reasonable cost (less than the likes of G4). Preparation is key in any painting situation and since the paint actually has to stick to the render to stop it flaking off taking away any dust before painting is a necessity. Another tip is to thin the paint substantially with water for the first coat allowing it to soak in and stick to the render, I actually thinned it enough to apply with a sprayer. My second thicker and final coat was applied by brush and roller which can be cleaned under the tap. Both coats bonded together and turned into a plasticised epoxy coating which is completely waterproof. Antel A1 can even be applied to damp surfaces.

    Since painting the pond around five years ago I have cleaned parts with the most powerful Karcher K7 pressure washer and have had no paint flaking off. It's all in the preparation.

    Kenny

  6. Thanks forever, Graeme, Gazkoi, paulbaines Thanked / Liked this Post
  7. #4
    Member Rank = Sansai forever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Oxted
    Posts
    93
    Thanks / Likes
    51
    thanks Kenny, the process sounds the same as the installer I spoke to went over

  8. #5
    Moderator Rank = Supreme Champion Feline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    6,140
    Thanks / Likes
    4779
    The disadvantage is that any cracks in the render from settlement or expansion, even small ones, will cause a leak.
    There are loads of threads on here where pond paints have failed, so a bit of a gamble. Make sure you get a guarantee from the person doing the job in case you have issues.

  9. Thanks Ajm, Gazkoi, paulbaines Thanked / Liked this Post
  10. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by forever View Post
    So finally found someone to finish off the build of my pond, his recommendation is smooth render the sides and bottom, then he uses a water proof paint, its not fibre glass, but he always does this on large ponds, any thoughts? I will find out the exact product when i get the quote but wondered if others have gone down this route..
    If you're going to render the pond, then painting is definitely an option in my opinion, although I'm guessing most people on here will disagree as it goes against the orthodoxy. Similar to Kenny, I rendered my block walls with a 3:1 mix with added glass fibres. This helps prevent cracking and has the added benefit of adding massive strength to the walls.

    I then painted the walls using a product called Aquacote, which I bought from Malcolm Green (https://koicarp.org.uk/). This stuff is pretty impressive - it's a 2-part epoxy and the end result is more of a film than a paint if you know what I mean. It's very easy to apply and tolerant of weather conditions, and sticks like **** to a blanket. Also note:
    • the base and bottom of my walls were slightly damp due to the water table - this was no problem
    • there is no extra treatment required for return pipes / skimmer / bottom drain interfaces - this stuff just sticks to it
    • there is no need to complete it all in one go (other than the tub you already have mixed)
    • you can apply it with a standard roller
    • the pond was filled with water the next day and has been running for over 3 years now and hasn't spilt a drop
    • it cost less than a quarter of the quotes for fibreglassing - I used the money to justify buying 3 nice Nisai after the big fill


    I appreciate it's not for everyone, and to be honest if money was no object at the time I probably would have gone for fibreglassing if only because you hear so many negative stories about pond paints. But having done it I would definitely use it again, and if you look over the threads on here many who fibreglass also have issues of one kind or another.

    I've attached some pics - the first two show the first coat, which is usually clear. You could leave it at that but I chose a black finish for the final coat. No laughing at my wonky rendering - I'm a software engineer by trade!

    20171015_163325.jpg


    20171015_163324.jpg


    20171015_180407 (1).jpg

    Don't hesitate to ask if you have any questions...

  11. Thanks forever, john1, Gazkoi, Letimgo, Handy Kenny Thanked / Liked this Post
  12. #7
    Senior Member Rank = Jussai Gazkoi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    Tividale
    Posts
    1,416
    Thanks / Likes
    2921
    If FG is in budget, Personally I would always opt for that.

    Ken alexander on here may be able to discuss with you as he does FG for a living...

    Cheers

    Gaz
    4,100 gallon pond, infinity window, duratec heater, aerated BD, 3 bakki showers full of BHM, amalgam UV, 3 Blue Eco’s, construction skimmer, trickle in/out, Oase Profi Drum and some very spoilt koi.

    3 separate grow on vats, one 1,600 gallon QT and a customer first business

    www.aurorakoi.co.uk

    www.facebook.com/aurorakoiuk

  13. #8
    It's all about the pond construction.
    If your pond is built in a way that settlement, ground heave or any other forces will never produce any cracks (other than hairline surface shrinkage) then a suitable paint is fine.
    So this means a pond with a thick reinforced concrete base, rebar tied to reinforced and/or thick walls.
    If you have that you can paint with a degree of confidence.
    The larger the pond, the harder it will be for the structure to accommodate movement without cracking.

    Many people do paint successfully onto less structurally bombproof ponds, but it is very likely that one day cracks will eventually appear (seen it a lot in swimming pools - so liners aren't only used here for lower cost).

    I used pond paint in parts of my filter house for the inlet/outlet chambers because they would be awkward to GF and they are relatively very small and solid.
    My pond construction method has a floor that doesn't even try to be crack-proof because it was always going to have a GRP liner (the walls would be good for a bomb shelter however
    ).
    My DIY ponds from 1988 until present day.
    All can be found here:
    https://www.ukzero.com/pond.htm

  14. #9
    Senior Member Rank = Nanasai Handy Kenny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Livingston Scotland
    Posts
    586
    Thanks / Likes
    867
    My 20,00 litre pond is more organically shaped i.e. the bottom is more round, it is also set into the ground rather than above it and the water comes to within an inch of the top of the render on the walls. The straight walls basically start just below current ground level. Standard 35N cement with 2 inch plastic needles but quantities accurately measured and mixed. I am hoping that this chinese spoon shape gives the structure more strength. I don't expect any slip or heave of the ground but who can tell! My thoughts were that if I did eventually have a problem I would go for glass fibre at that time. Been OK for 5 years.

    WP_20150712_003.jpg

    I remember reading about a guy who simply dug a hollow in the ground, threw in a rubber liner filled it with water and called it a pond. He thought anything more was a waste!

    Kenny

  15. Thanks woodberry Thanked / Liked this Post
 

 

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:51 PM. Online Koi Mag Forum
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2021 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

vBulletin Improved By vBFoster® (Lite Version), © UltimateScheme, Ltd.