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  1. #21
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Supreme Champion john1's Avatar
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    Not sure on the above but as you say it saves a lot of room as in footprint so considering it but it is quite a big upheaval for my set up.
    John

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  3. #22
    Senior Member Rank = Grand Champion davethefish1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggrowe View Post
    I thought bio chambers produced quite a few nitrates?
    And showers among other things reduced nitrates?

    Would it not be better to have shower after bio, or because of flow completely separate from bio?

    Would the nitrates be reduced if just recirculating through the shower over the bio?

    Would like to know, because a shower over my bio chamber would be perfect for the space I have, but always thought it wasn’t worth it due to the above?


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    i'd say it's definately worth it, even if just for the oxygenation of the water...
    but all extra bio, especially shower media with its enourmous surface area.
    increases the adaptability of your pond to changes in waste output from feeding and seasonal changes,
    or from biological knock back due to medication.
    Last edited by davethefish1; 13-01-2022 at 11:32 AM.

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  5. #23
    Senior Member Rank = Jussai Twhitenosugar's Avatar
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    How I see it, rightly or wrongly, is that by having the shower being fed directly from the bio, any nitrate removal that the shower can do, happens before it gets sent to the pond.

    And this would be booster further if any water that exits the shower is pumped back over it again (as probably happens to a certain extent).

    So in theory, the nitrates in the water leaving the bio are lower with this setup... than if 100% of the nitrates created were to flow into the pond (as would happen if the shower is on a separate line to the bio) until they are eventually pumped over the shower.

    Of course that could be a load of bull, and it's probably the case that the levels of nitrate in the pond will be the same, regardless of whether the shower is fed from the bio or is on its own line, as I guess that it can only remove nitrates at a particular rate.

    But tbh I set my shower up as I did because I was tight on space and being a DIY shower, I didn't want it on show - rather than for nitrate removal.

    Here is a pic of my set up. Its a bit messy but you get the idea how I've done it.


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    13,000L fibreglassed raised pond with window

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  7. #24
    Moderator Rank = Supreme Champion Feline's Avatar
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    Showers reduce nitrates by gassing off some of the ammonia directly rather than converting it into nitrite and then nitrate.
    That means if you let a bio chamber create the nitrates first, your shower cannot prevent them being formed so your shower will fail to keep nitrates down.

    In my setup I have everything going through my combi-drum then most returning via a shower and some returning via the heat pump line. Technically that is not ideal- for the reason I just said above - however the flow rate I’m pulling through the bio to my shower is fast so there is no way the bio will have dealt with all of the ammonia by the time it reaches the shower anyway.

    I did consider altering my pipework to pull from clean side over the shower so the bio could have a slower flow and longer dwell time and the shower could have ‘first crack’ at the ammonia, but I’ve monitored the water over the years and have not really got an issue to fix. Nitrates are not too high, and ammonia very low. I would have to make a 3” or 4” hole in the combi if I wanted to send to the shower. By no means hard to do but I won’t bother if I don’t need to

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  9. #25
    Senior Member Rank = Grand Champion davethefish1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feline View Post
    Showers reduce nitrates by gassing off some of the ammonia directly rather than converting it into nitrite and then nitrate.
    That means if you let a bio chamber create the nitrates first, your shower cannot prevent them being formed so your shower will fail to keep nitrates down.
    100% agreee it is by ammonia gassing off that showers help keep nitrates down.
    some anerobic action may be taking place, but no where near enough to have any meaningful impact on the pond.

    if you ever ran a reef tank and tried to denitrify it using anerobic bacteria alone, you need a massive amount of oxygen deprived filter area
    the equivalent in a koi pond would probably be 4 IBC's full of shower media.
    and thats only feeding miniscule amounts of reef food, compared to a koi pond...

    i was considering using a shower alone to filter my pond, and may still get rid of the moving bed.
    but only to replace the media with more shower media to give me an even larger surface area for colonisation.

    it also doesn't put all my ' biological eggs' in one basket so to speak.
    should the power fail for days when i'm not home (not often these days)
    and the shower media completely dry out.
    i'd still have some media left submerged and 'alive'.

    i run my shower at 1.5 to 2 times and hour turn over pumped from the drum to the shower in the filter house,
    and returned under gravity to the pond.
    that way i keep a high percentage of pond water constantly being presented to the bacteria.
    that has the side effect of keeping pond clarity high.
    and currently my ammonia at Nil


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