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  1. #1
    Senior Member Rank = Yonsai JimJones's Avatar
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    cutting into fibreglass multibay

    Hello

    i have one of those multibays where the vortex is connected to the multibay via a rectangular tray into a brsh chamber.

    i would like to cut off the vortex and connected to the multibay via standard 4 inch pipe

    is it possible to dill and round hole in the multibay side then out in a gasket to allow the pipe connection.

    thanks

    jim



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  3. #2
    Extreme Koi Member Rank = Supreme Champion john1's Avatar
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    Hi Jim, I Presume you mean cut into the fiberglass to fit a 4ins tank connecter then if so then yes you can.
    It could be cut by drilling a pilot hole and useing a pad saw or similar,if curved you will need a curved tank connecter or if flat a flat one and solvent weld in a 4ins pipe.
    Hope this helps mate.
    John

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  5. #3
    Senior Member Rank = Yonsai JimJones's Avatar
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    yeah exactly what i am after thanks

    was a bit worried that is may crack. i have a full set of round drill bits 1.5 inch up to 4 so was thinking of jigsawing off the vortex then of connecting the 4 inch piping. The multibay wall is vertical so hopefully could be put in correctly and flush. seal the joint with gold lavel and tighten it up.

    thanks mate

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  7. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JimJones View Post
    yeah exactly what i am after thanks

    was a bit worried that is may crack. i have a full set of round drill bits 1.5 inch up to 4 so was thinking of jigsawing off the vortex then of connecting the 4 inch piping. The multibay wall is vertical so hopefully could be put in correctly and flush. seal the joint with gold lavel and tighten it up.

    thanks mate

    You definitely can do what you're thinking of doing, but I would warn you to be careful about the way you go about actually doing the cutting.

    I'm guessing your large-diameter drillbits are holesaws?

    If so, one needs to be careful because holesaws can snatch quite violently when the teeth suddenly 'bite' (this is even worse with cheap flimsy holesaws, which can flex and distort, which makes them snatch even more violently), and this is particularly a problem when using them on thin material, like fibreglass, because the only thing stopping the entire 4" holesaw from snatching and then skidding violently sideways (often causing serious damage to surrounding material, instead of creating a nice round hole) is the pilot drillbit attached to the center of the holesaw - the problem being that, when cutting thin material, as soon as the teeth begin to bite they are partially through the material quite quickly, thus leaving very little strong material for the pilot drill to rely upon, in order to keep the huge 4" bit on target.

    THEREFORE, it can sometimes be helpful to try running the drill in reverse, whilst cutting the hole. Of course, it will cut much less efficiently, and it's possible that you might find it's really too inefficient to get the job done - but I do suggest you at least try cutting the hole with the drill running in reverse, because you will find it cuts in a vastly more controlled manner, with greatly-reduced risk of snatching.

    Sometimes it is possible to clamp a piece of wood to the underside of what you're drilling through, to provide plenty of 'meat' for the pilot drill to drill through, securely, but that's not always possible with awkward shapes like what you're describing. If you have the patience to do it, I can suggest you attach a piece of wood to the underside of the fibreglass, using silicone, so that the pilot drill can securely drill into this whilst the 4" holesaw is cutting all the way through the fibreglass. Any wood that is still siliconed on to the filter chamber after the hole has been cut can be quite easily removed if you are careful (not so much by prying, but by very carefully slicing the silicone away, using a fully-extended 18mm 'snap-off-blade' knife. Many gentle slices rather than heavy pressure, in order to prevent nasty accidents, or the blade breaking). I know this sounds like a major hassle, but it can actually be the best thing to do, sometimes, because it's a bloody nightmare if someone doesn't take care and the holesaw skids, and gouges or cracks parts of the fibreglass that one wishes to remain perfectly intact.

    So... yeah.... my advice would be to at least try cutting in reverse rotation if you can. If it's too inefficient for you, then so be it, but at least try it and see how you get on. If it doesn't work out, then consider siliconing a piece of timber or ply to the underside of the material being cut.

    I'm saying this on the basis of many years experience using holesaws on a variety of materials, but if it all sounds like too much hassle, then that's up to you and I respect your decision, either way.
    Last edited by MustBeSomethingInTheWater; 14-11-2019 at 03:54 PM.

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  9. #5
    Senior Member Rank = Yonsai JimJones's Avatar
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    thank you for the advice that is great advice.

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