Welcome to Koi Forum. Is this your first visit? Register
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    Fresh water clam a good living filter media

    Hi, guys, I have taken a video of Fresh water clam adult size, have a look at https://youtu.be/ZLyR39U8VEA



  2. #2
    Senior Member Rank = Grand Champion voodoo_15_uk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    York
    Posts
    4,358
    Thanks / Likes
    2816
    I've heard if you keep them in your pond and they die they become toxic and kill your fish?

  3. Thanks freddyboy Thanked / Liked this Post
  4. #3
    Moderator Rank = Supreme Champion Feline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    5,013
    Thanks / Likes
    2613
    They need cloudy green water as a food source, and hard water. They alse need a mud or sand substrate in the bottom to burrow into. They dont live long in a koi pond with clear water, and as Laura says die and rot in the water causing big problems.
    As filters they are pretty useless as they excrete ammonia just like your fish.

    Would not even consider them in a koi pond myself.

  5. Thanks voodoo_15_uk, lee63, freddyboy Thanked / Liked this Post
  6. #4
    yes, if they are dead it will make your pond water foul I did not place them in my pond I place them in my biological filter chamber and check them if they are still alive.

  7. #5
    Thank you for your feedback bro, I need to be careful handling with them.

  8. #6
    Below is a link to my thoughts on using swan mussels as pond filters. It is easy to jump to the conclusion that, as swan mussels are filter feeders, they are useful in a koi pond because they filter water to obtain nutrients. But those who advocate that idea clearly haven't thought the situation through and have ignored the parasitic larval stage where the mussel larvae (glochidia) that are released into the water attach themselves to fish gills to grow and develop. The injury they cause doing this makes them very unsuitable in any pond, let alone a koi pond.

    There are differences between clams and mussels and I don't have time to look into the laval stages of clams but my gut feeling is that, in such closely related species, the life cycle will be the same.

    Freshwater clams are edible so when you remove them from your pond they will, at least, have some use.
    Swan mussels

  9. Thanks voodoo_15_uk, lee63, freddyboy Thanked / Liked this Post
  10. #7
    Moderator Rank = Supreme Champion Feline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Somerset
    Posts
    5,013
    Thanks / Likes
    2613
    Quote Originally Posted by Manky Sanke View Post
    Below is a link to my thoughts on using swan mussels as pond filters. It is easy to jump to the conclusion that, as swan mussels are filter feeders, they are useful in a koi pond because they filter water to obtain nutrients. But those who advocate that idea clearly haven't thought the situation through and have ignored the parasitic larval stage where the mussel larvae (glochidia) that are released into the water attach themselves to fish gills to grow and develop. The injury they cause doing this makes them very unsuitable in any pond, let alone a koi pond.

    There are differences between clams and mussels and I don't have time to look into the laval stages of clams but my gut feeling is that, in such closely related species, the life cycle will be the same.

    Freshwater clams are edible so when you remove them from your pond they will, at least, have some use.
    Swan mussels
    It's my understanding that clams don't have a parasitic larval stage, so don't directly damage fish in the same way mussels can.
    But their other disadvantages and lack of efficacy at biological filtration would make it a pointless exercise anyway in my book

  11. Thanks lee63, freddyboy Thanked / Liked this Post
  12. #8
    Just unionid mussels attach to fish gills to complete their life cycle that are found in North America. There are other clams found in freshwater that do not require fish to attach to during the larval stage.

  13. #9
    It would take a sizeable population of any freshwater bivalve to noticeably affect the water clarity on the typical garden pond. Notice the number of clams in the small aquarium in the video. Multiply this by the capacity (gallons) of your pond.
    This is not to say that they would not be a welcome addition to the overall diversity of a pond.

  14. Thanks dc197 Thanked / Liked this Post
  15. #10
    I donít want to become sidetracked by the distribution of the swan mussel but, if you check, you will find that the Unionidae family of freshwater mussels have worldwide distribution.

    However, on the subject of clams, I fail to see the purpose of adding clams to a pond. Their natural behaviour is to bury themselves in mud or silt so, unless you intend to allow the pond to become dirty, with all the associated parasite problems that would bring; the environment would be unsuitable leading to their early death.

    I also did a quick Google for the life cycle of freshwater clams and, as I suspected, I found references to a parasitic larval stage. Click this for a description:

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=xcsACAAAQBAJ&pg=PA187&lpg=PA187&dq=freshw ater+clam+life+cycle+parasitic+larvae+-mussel&source=bl&ots=e261yx1lL4&sig=CFx1F2eykgtsUo w_P3oPCGS9SuY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjF1efOi47XAhXD tRoKHcgUCvIQ6AEIODAG#v=onepage&q=freshwater%20clam %20life%20cycle%20parasitic%20larvae%20-mussel&f=false





    Also an illustration from:
    Elizabeth Newhall (Buchsbaum) ? D.B. Dowd / Studio Notes: Writing on Illustration




    Elizabeth Buchsbaum, Animals Without Backbones (. Illustration of the parasitic life cycle of a freshwater clam.

  16. Thanks milaz, giobelkoicenter Thanked / Liked this Post
  17. #11
    Thank you Manky, I remove them in the pond already and place them in a separate container

 

 

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:34 PM. Online Koi Mag Forum
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.

vBulletin Improved By vBFoster® (Lite Version), © UltimateScheme, Ltd.